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Message to local residents regarding demolition works

The demolition of the old Alder Hey hospital site is due to begin on 24th April 2017.

Demolition will take place over two phases, which are highlighted on the plan overleaf, scheduled to be completed by 2019.

Phase one will begin on the Eaton Road side of our old hospital site, before moving around to the buildings along Alder Road. This phase of demolition activity is due to finish in October 2017.

The remaining buildings located alongside the new hospital and up to the top of the site boundary will then be demolished during phase two, which is expected to be completed by 2019.

John Beech Ltd has been appointed as the main contractor for the demolition works and will be responsible for all aspects of the demolition. They will be making every effort to minimise disruption to the local community.

Specialist demolition equipment will minimise the generation of dust by water dousing and there will be dust monitoring systems installed across the site to measure levels to ensure we can keep them to acceptable levels.

Demolition workers have been asked to park vehicles within the hospital site itself to reduce pressures on resident parking around local roads. Heavy vehicles will be closely managed, with minimal heavy vehicle traffic as the majority of demolished materials (rubble and brickwork) will remain on site to be processed and reused.

Demolition activities will take place Monday to Friday (8am-5pm) and Saturday (8am-1pm).

If you have any concerns at all about the demolition works or require any additional details please contact the John Beech Ltd Group offices on 0151 645 7571.

You can also contact our team here at the Trust via Jean Hutfield on 0151 252 5169 or visit this website for more information.

Alder Hey continues to work with Liverpool City Council to develop the Alder Hey campus and enhance the reinstated Springfield Park once demolition has completed. We are aware of concerns from some local residents around potential development on brownfield land belonging to the Trust. We are currently in the process of preparing a revised planning application and will be consulting with the local community.

Our intent has always been to reinstate the park while greatly enhancing the area to create something special for the local community, our patients, families and our staff.  We look forward to sharing our revised proposals in more detail with the local community during a number of consultation events later this year.

 

Frequently asked questions

When does demolition start and how long will it last?

Demolition of the old Alder Hey hospital site is due to begin on 24th April 2017.

Demolition will take place over two phases:

  • Phase one will begin on the Eaton Road side of our old hospital site, before moving around to the buildings along Alder Road. This phase of demolition activity is due to finish in October 2017.
  • The remaining buildings located alongside the new hospital and up to the top of the site boundary will then be demolished during phase two, which is expected to be completed by 2019.

What time of day are the works taking place?

Demolition activities will take place Monday to Friday (8am-5pm) and Saturday (8am-1pm).

Who is the contractor for demolition?

The principal contractor is John Beech Ltd.

Will the demolition be noisy?

Noise will be minimal. The building will be very gradually dismantled using substantive mechanical long reach excavators modified for this type of work.

Will there be a lot of dust caused by the demolition?

These works will incorporate water dousing using industry specialist equipment to suppress the generation of dust during the demolition process. There will also be dust monitoring systems on key boundaries of the site to ensure that the dust mitigation provisions are and remain effective.

Will the works have an impact on parking and traffic around the site?

Demolition workers will be parking vehicles on the hospital site itself.

There will occasionally be heavy good vehicles leaving and entering the site and these will be managed carefully to minimise disruption. The demolition materials which will comprise mostly of concrete and brick rubble will be stockpiled towards the Alder Road side of the site before being crushed and reused in the regeneration of the site.

How can I raise a concern or find out more about the demolition works?

If you have any concerns at all about the demolition works or require any additional details please contact the John Beech Ltd Group offices on 0151 645 7571.

You can also contact our team here at the Trust about the demolition via Jean Hutfield on 0151 252 5169.

What is the land going to be used for?

Springfield Park will be reinstated when the old hospital buildings are demolished at the same area as it was before (minimum 9 hectares)

There is additional space on the site still owned by the Trust, which will be developed into office space, the second phase of a dedicated research building and a possible residential development.

Are you building houses on parkland?

No.  We remain committed to reinstating Springfield Park once the old hospital buildings are demolished.

Why is it being claimed that houses are being built on the park?

Confusion was caused by an outline planning permission that was submitted for a residential development at the edge of the park on unused Trust land.  The planning application did not include the whole park so it was not clear that the park still sits alongside. Some misinterpreted this and thought that houses were being built on the park. This is not the case.

It is important to note that the overall footprint of the old Alder Hey hospital site is bigger than the parkland that is being reinstated, so there is other ‘brownfield’ land available to develop in addition to reinstating the park.

Is this different from the initial plans submitted for the Hospital and Park that were the basis for the land swap agreement?

It differs in terms of the original outline application for the hospital and park but only in terms of the way the park is configured. There was no detail on the original outline in terms of the remainder of the old hospital estate and how it would be redeveloped.

Will the park area be smaller than it was before?

No. It will be the full 9 hectares, as promised. It will be configured differently though and will be much improved. The intent is to make it a better space that is used by more people in the local community.

The original schemes did not mention housing at all, why is it in there now?

The schemes that were shared originally always had the existing buildings along Alder Road remaining in place (the building called Mulberry House).

In the intervening years, it became apparent that these buildings would not be suitable space for use by the hospital and that all office space needs could be accommodated in the new office block development through ‘smart working’ practices that are now routine in most large organisations.

Since then the Government has also instigated the ‘Government’s Surplus Public Sector Land Programme’  with a target of 160,000 housing units to be built on sold surplus public sector land, such as the brownfield site that includes the derelict Mulberry House, by March 2020 to support house builds and economic growth.

At the same time, when considering the design of the new park, one concern that came up regularly was security and lighting within the park. This could be partly addressed by creating residential space across the brownfield site where Mulberry House is, as this would create community activity, footfall and lighting and ‘frame’ the Alder Road boundary of the park.

Your comments

  • As someone who knows the area well whatever the intentions of the Trust it is the lack of trust [no pun intended] because of the perceived and actual secrecy of policies such as the Strategic Transformation Plan and the continuing antics of many CCGs which results in suspicion and anger. The statement that the STP just needs some tidying up after publication does not help.
    In fact Warrigton CCG has disowned it – good for them.
    All those involved in the NHS directly or indirectly as providers and management consultants and demolition companies etc are subject to the same requirements of Transparency and Duty of Candour; as one prominent public interest lawyer said there can be no claims to commercial confidentiality where public monies are concerned.
    Simon Stevens declares that he wants the NHS to be the most efficient and transparent health service in the world- here there is clearly a need for ‘improvement’

    My wife lived in Lymm, imagine trying such a ‘village’ development there and what does the term ‘village’ mean? You cannot just fabricate a village there already is one – West Derby.

  • Apologies I think the term used relating to STP was ‘firm up’.

  • I note, in your FAQ section, you state that the original scheme did not foresee that Mulberry House would not be of use to the Trust. You now tell us that it is obsolete, only fit for demolition to be a brownfield site ripe for residential development.
    This leaves us with one of two conclusions, You knew all along that Mulberry House would be unsuitable and decided to not mention it as it would have no doubt scuppered your relocation plans, or, you have in your employment staff who can make a monumental misjudgement, no doubt costing the taxpayer many millions, assessing that Mulberry House would be fit for purpose, and a few years later, Oh No! its totally unsuitable and will have to be demolished.
    Either conclusion is totally unacceptable and to use the excuse of the introduction of smart working practice as a reason for change, is equally lamentable, such working practices were in existence at the time of the initial planning application.
    It would be helpful at this late stage to introduce some honesty into your dealings with local residents and the general public.

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